27 July 2008

Fun Monday 07.28.08



The week's Fun Monday is being hosted by Mommy Wizdom.

The Rules:

If you were ruler for a day/week/month/year (your choice on the time) you would...

ex...make coffee free to all citizens. Or you'd abolish the penny. You may also specify if you're ruler of the world or just your country. Have fun with it; be creative.

If you like to dress up, you may also choose to take pictures of yourself in your "ruler" outfit(s) and post them up with your entry.


Robocop's Comment:

This one is going to be fun. It is too bad that I could not upload or download images for this post (thank you Vista), but I will work with what I have. Of course, the rules do not specify one thing, which is good for me, because I have a number of things which I would do...

If I were ruler for a year (in this case, the year 1787) of the United States Of America, I would do a number of things. These things would not necessarily be in this order. Before I proceed, here is a quick SITREP of the year: It has been about four years since the American Revolutionary War was officially over with the Treaty Of Paris. The novice politicians were in the process of establishing a new form of government for the United States Of America. Now there are a few things I would have done to clarify our great country, and to avoid the future misunderstandings that would plague our history.

I would have freed the slaves,

gave women, and all races the right to vote (as long as they were US citizens),

legislated racial and gender equality,

actually paid the Revolutionary War Veterans their due,

and made common English the national language from the get go.

In addition to the above, I would have clarified The United States Constitution. Did I mention that I we would be using common English? I think the snobbish intellectual mindset of our founders caused them to write the document too formally, paving the way to future confusion. I would have it state things as what they actually meant. Now for a small example, I will use the Bill Of Rights, which are the first ten Amendments to The US Constitution. I might even tweak it out a small bit.

Amendment I

Before:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

After:

Congress will not force the people to worship God, or prevent them from worshiping God on their own free will. The peoples' right say what they want, write what they want, assemble in peaceful protest, or complain to the Government will not be interfered with.

Amendment II

Before:

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

After:

The people have the individual right to keep, and carry arms for the purpose of defending their safety, and liberty.

Amendment III

Before:

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

After:

No homeowner or tenant will be required to house a soldier.

Amendment IV

Before:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

After:

There will be no unreasonable searches and seizures of the people, their homes, their property without a warrant attained due to an actual reason. The warrant will specify person, place, or thing to be searched and/or seized.

Amendment V

Before:

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

After:

No Citizen will be charged with a serious crime without a Grand Jury indictment, unless in the service of the armed forces in time of crisis. No one will be tried twice for the same crime, forced to testify against himself, or deprived in any way without due process. Private property will not be taken for public use without just compensation that reflects the current market value.

Amendment VI

Before:

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

After:

In all criminal prosecutions, the citizen who is accused has a right to a quick public trial by jury not to exceed 30 days, at the State and district the crime was committed. He will be told what he is accused of, confront and obtain witnesses, and to have legal representation.

Amendment VII

Before:

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

After:

In Civil suits that involve values exceeding twenty dollars, the right to trial by jury will be preserved.

Amendment VIII

Before:

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

After:

Excessive bail or fines will not be imposed. The punishment shall always fit the crime.

Amendment IX

Before:

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

After:

If a right is not listed in the Constitution, it does not meant a right does not exist, as long as it does not harm anyone.

Amendment X

Before:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

After:

Powers not given to the Federal Government specifically are reserved to the State governments.

Would this have changed history? Yes. This might have even prevented Civil War. Would this have prevented interpretation by the courts? No, but it would be harder for judges to make up stuff too.

I hope this was not too boring.

33 comments:

Sandy said...

How clever you were to pick a specific year in the past. It never occurred to me.

Very clever.

Debs said...

Great job. Our country would have been better off.

Peter said...

I'm gonna take the 5th on that question Robocop.

Mariposa said...

Wow...so so smart!!!

Robyn said...

Well...this was an interesting post...probably as interesting as my post! I will be back to visit you often. I have scanned some of your earlier posts...very interesting reading! Good Job on being 'ruler' for the year! I would have very much been in that scenrio if you were 'ruler'
Hugs,
Robyn

karisma said...

No! Not too boring! Great Wisdom there! I agree with you totally! But I was kinda waiting to hear you say "And everyone must wear boots!"

Now wouldn't it be nice if we could turn back time and you could make it true?

karisma said...

Oh yeah! And I decree that anyone as wise and thoughtful as yourself may be permitted to wear their boots in Karisma's world!

Hootin' Anni said...

You go Robo!!!!

I personally LOVE the proper English. Altho, no one speaks this way any more. You did good. So, where do we vote for YOU as ruler?

Sayre said...

I"m sure the more formal language made more sense back then, but we don't use it any more - unless you are trained in reading it, most people don't understand it.

You did an excellent job of breaking things down. Every teacher I know should print this out and use it when teaching the Consitution in history class!

SwampAngel65 said...

Smart idea! I agree 100%. Very well done and thought out. Can you imagine how things would have been if you HAD been ruler back then??? Hmmm...

iPost said...

Interesting! I am not sure I agree with the wording changes in the Constitution. Perhaps our forefathers weren't too snooty or intellectual...perhaps we, as a nation, have lowered our standards and have become dumber and less concerned about expressing our selves in a proper way.

And I am the first one to admit I dumb myself down, 'cuz I am a redneck and all. ;0)

Olive said...

With you as ruler back then everything would be different today. Did I mention it would be in English?

Robocop said...

Thanks for visiting everyone. Sayer and iPost: The former English used back then was used only by the affluent. The farmer,blacksmith,dock worker,etc... used a more simpler form, even if it is not the current language used today.

Arkansas Songbird said...

Interesting take on today's assignment.

Gattina said...

Thanks god we don't have such a constitution ! Ours is clear and understandable.

The Libertine said...

Hmmm - an NIV version of the Constitution; I like it.
Beware of vague or over broad language, though, even if it is plain - i.e. the NIV ninth ammendment "does not harm anyone". I can see court cases attempting to provide a definition of "harm" or of "anyone" (Think PETA here...). Very well done, though. It's refreshing to see someone using their temporary tyrant status to end tyranny.

Faye said...

Legislation that the common man(woman)can understand--too bad you weren't around to help the post Revolutionary guys.

swampy said...

Boring? I think not. I'm impressed that you took so much time to create this very thought provoking post.
Makes me feel like a dweeb holding my yardstick.

Robocop said...

You are not a dweeb. We all have important ideas regarding improving our world. There are no small ideas.

grace said...

wow! you gave this a lot of thought, I would vote for you

Big Momma said...

You have my vote!

Irish Coffeehouse said...

You are very creative! Great post and way to post it!

MommyWizdom said...

Wow, you sure put a lot of thought into this one. You put me to shame. Thanks for all your great ideas and thanks for participating. I've enjoyed your comments on others' blogs too.

Molly said...

I think that your post is quite fascinating. Your personal no nonesense plain English revision of the Bill of Rights in enlightening.

Molly said...

Make that, "is enlightening."

IamwhoIam said...

I like you take on the BILL OF RIGHT. Thanks

lisaschaos said...

Wow you went to a lot of work! I vote you in! I like your easy language to the constitution!

Pamela said...

hmmm... this is all very interesting to me because I'm trying to finish up the book "Founding Mothers"

One of the women wrote letters encouraging her husband to give rights to women.

Ari_1965 said...

Thanks for visiting my blog today.

Alison said...

Hmm..very interesting, definitely not boring. I do think your revisions would clarify and simplify many things..very well thought out post...I like it!!

jientje said...

That's putting it in a much simpler way, thanks!!! You put a lot of effort into this one, well done!

ChrisB said...

Your first four points are great ideas. I have to confess to not being overly familiar with the US Constitution /Bill of Rights so I read this with interest!

Fianna said...

Awesome! Now to fix today's problems, can we get a follow up?